Tag Archives: Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales

Out of the Cellar: Dogfish Head World Wide Stout

Well I finally got around to actually taking a beer from my cellared stock and drinking it.

Granted, at face value, this does not really seem like it would take a lot of effort but for any fellow beer geeks that cellar you may empathize with my reluctance at opening a beer I have had in my care for years. I mean I went to all that effort of buying usually expensive, usually seasonal and usually scarce beers that in order to really get the best drinking experience needs to hang-out for months if not years. This means I would often go into my storage space look at the beer, maybe pick it up and re-read the label and then congratulate myself on the will power to not drink it right away.

This can lead to a bit of a vicious cycle when that nagging voice tells you, “just wait a little longer and it might get even better“.

Setting aside the obvious concern that I am either believing my beer is talking to me or that some tiny cicerone resides in my head, the hubby and I decided it was time to open our Dogfish Head World Wide Stout 2010, which we have fostered for some years now.

Dogfish Head World Wide Stout

From the brewery website:

Yes, this is the beer you’ve heard so much about!

Brewed with a ridiculous amount of barley, World Wide Stout is dark, roasty and complex. This Ageable Ale clocks in at 15-20% ABV and has a depth more in line with a fine port than with a can of cheap, mass-marketed beer.

World Wide debuted in the winter of 1999, and the staying power of this brew is undeniable. Like Fort and 120 Minute IPA, World Wide Stout only gets better with age. After some time in your beer cellar, the heat of the booze fades into the background and the port notes and roastiness take over.

World Wide goes great with (or as!) dessert. Share one with someone you love.

 

World Wide Stout pours deep dark black with a minimal amount of mocha coloured head, just a skim really. Huge molasses, coffee, chocolate and dried fruit nose with a big whiff of alcohol. Rich and dense in the mouth feel, full bodied, with slight carbonation and very warming though I have to say the cellaring really took away any harsh edges from the ridiculously high ABV. Flavours are pretty much everything you want in a big stout roasted grains, chocolate sweetness, strong notes of dried fruit and molasses and a coffee presence. This stout finishes strong with a nice roasted bitter taste. World Wide Stout is most definitely one to savour over an evening or to share with a friend (as the Dogfish people suggest).

Overall one of the best stouts on the market and a perfect candidate for long-term cellaring so if you haven’t started aging craft beer yet what the heck are you waiting for?

Advertisements

Pulling into Elizabeth Station

As a frequent cross-border beer shopper I thought I knew all the hidden gems for finding the best craft beer selection in Bellingham, WA but apparently I did not know squat because I had not been to Elizabeth Station.

Elizabeth Station Entrance

Elizabeth Station is an impressive shop brimming with craft beer fridges organized geographically, a decent wine and spirit section and quite possibly that largest selection of junk food I have ever seen.

Beer Fridges at Elizabeth Station

From jars of candy to a cereal bar to towering shelves of chips to sandwiches Elizabeth Station basically has all manner of food stuffs any self-respecting person with the munchies may or may not have to good sense to ignore.

Thankfully they also have a three beer limit so I won’t inadvertently become compelled to purchase a Ring Pop for each finger after a few too many.

Candy at Elizabeth Station

 

Cereal on Tap

In addition, and perhaps most importantly, Elizabeth Station boasts a small selection of taps, growler fills and bottle service – see something you like in the fridge and they will open it for you and you can consume in store.

On Tap

While there I had the pleasure of trying Petrus Aged Pale from Bavik-De Bradandere on tap, a lovely crisp, bright sour that serves as the mother (the starter beer) for the rest of the beers in the brewery’s line-up.

My hubby asked for a porter recommendation from the resident beer guy and was very impressed with the suggested Anchor Porter.

We took home a bottle of Vlad the Impaler form Cascade and a four of 90min IPA from Dogfish Head to commemorate our visit.

So next time you find yourself in downtown Bellingham stop in and be impressed!

Petrus Aged Pale

 


New Brew Friday

It’s Friday once again and I hope this post finds everyone recovering nicely from their IPA day celebrations.

I marked this most sacred of beer geek holidays by finally breaking open my bottle of Sixty-One an IPA brewed with Syrah grape must.

Yup must, which at first glance does not really sound that appetizing but the all-knowing and all-seeing Wiki defines must (from the Latin vinum mustum, “young wine”) as freshly pressed juice that contains the skins, seeds, and stems of the fruit. Making must is the first step in wine making. Because of its high glucose content must is also used as a sweetener in a variety of cuisines. Unlike commercially sold grape juice, which is filtered and pasteurized, must is thick with particulate matter, opaque, and comes in various shades of brown and/or purple.

 

Dogfish Head Sixty-One

 

Dogfish Head Sixty-One 6.5%

Sixty-One pours a clear cranberry colour with just a light skim of white head and nice lacing. There is quite a lot of carbonation to this beer. Prominent grape juice nose with citrus hops. First couple sips, this beer seems like a typical Dogfish Head IPA (always a good thing) then you get a fruity sweetness on the finish. As you drink the Syrah character emerges more giving the IPA a bit of a spicy dark fruit flavour. The finish has a nice amount of bitter hoppiness.

Overall a very clean drinking beer that manages to marry characteristics from both the beer and the wine world. I like to think of this beer as bridging the gulf between beer drinkers and wine drinkers, a sort of olive branch saying hey, we’re not that different after all.


The Great Pumpkin Beer Wrap-Up

Well I did it (self congratulatory pat on the back) I tried nineteen different pumpkin beers  leading up to Hallowe’en and I am happy to not have to see or drink another pumpkin beer until next year. In honour of this feat I thought I would put together a little wrap-up by ranking the pumpkin brews 1 through 19 to give my readers a better sense of my favourite and not so favourite beers.

 

 

Starting at the top of the gourd pile we have…

1. Southern Tier Pumking

2. Elysian Night Owl

3. Dogfish Head Punkin Ale

4. Parallel 49 Schadenfreude

5. Granville Island Pumpkin Ale

6. St. Ambroise Citrouille (Pumpkin)

7. Parallel 49 Lost Souls

8. Tree Jumpin Jack

9. Elysian Dark O’ the Moon

10. Elysian Hansel and Gretel

11. Steamworks Pumpkin Ale

12. Epic Brewing Imperial Pumpkin Porter

13. Fernie Pumpkin Head

14. Red Racer Pumpkin Ale

15. Howe Sound Pumpkineater

16. Two Beers Pumpkin Spice Ale

17. Pike Harlot’s Harvest

18. Lighthouse Pumpkin Ale

19. Phillips Crooked Tooth

 

Now onto the Great Christmas Beer Countdown, 55 beers in 55 days …just kidding!

 


Pumpkin Beer Seven, A Little Taste of Heaven

Punkin Ale from Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales marks one week into my kooky pumpkin project and since I am still enjoying the ales I sample that is a pretty good sign I just might make it all the way to Halloween.

 

 

Punkin Ale pours a very clear deep orange with a small amount of white head that has really good retention. There is lots of pumpkin pie spice on the nose, definitely all spice and nutmeg, and a little caramel sweetness. It is very smooth in the mouthfeel with just enough body to carry the big flavours. Taste wise this one is more pumpkin pie than real pumpkin but there is a touch of earthiness that reassures you there were pumpkins in the brew. The flavours carry through to the finish but there is no lingering aftertaste. Punkin Ale is imminently drinkable.

 

This is my second go with Punkin Ale; the first time I had it I was not a big fan but this time out …wow. Punkin Ale may just rival Southern Tier’s Pumking as my favourite pumpkin ale this year but I’ll hold off on a final verdict until the bittersweet end.

 

I give Punkin Ale nine candy corns out of a possible ten.

 

 

 

 

“Because the movie Halloween (1978) was on such a tight budget, they had to use the cheapest mask they could find for the character Michael Meyers, which turned out to be a William Shatner Star Trek mask. Shatner initially didn’t know the mask was in his likeness, but when he found out years later, he said he was honored” 

Halloween Facts from http://facts.randomhistory.com/halloween-facts.html


A Pumpkin (Beer) a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

 

Hallowe’en is one of my favourite holidays – dressing up as someone or something else, eating too much candy corn, watching cheesy horror movies and, of course, the arrival of pumpkin beers!

To honour this holiday in the best beer geek fashion I am going to do a series of blogs reviewing a different pumpkin beer everyday until Hallowe’en.

I have a pretty decent selection in the fridge but I will need some recommendations to meet my goal so feel free to add your favourites to the comments section…

 

Pumpkin Beers on Deck

Phillips Crooked Tooth Pumpkin Ale

Tree Brewing Co. Jumpin Jack Pumpkin Ale

Parallel 49 Lost Souls Chocolate Pumpkin Porter

Steamworks Pumpkin Ale

Elysian Night Owl Pumpkin Ale

Fernie Brewing Co. Pumpkin Head Pumpkin Brown Ale

Parallel 49 Schadenfreude Pumpkin Oktoberfest

St. Ambroise The Great Pumpkin Ale

Epic Brewing Fermentation without Representation Imperial Pumpkin Porter

Two Beers Brewing Co. Pumpkin Spice Ale

Elysian Dark O’ the Moon Pumpkin Stout

Dogfish Head Punkin Ale

Pike Brewing Co. Harlot’s Harvest Pike Pumpkin Ale

Southern Tier Pumking Ale


It’s Lager Time!

Summer is great; more hours of sunshine, warmer temperatures, less clothing, BBQ dinners, nights on the patio, wearing sunglasses, eating gelato, going on holidays, swimming in the ocean, watching fireworks …need I continue?  With this advent of sunny weather, and the resultant increase in endorphins, comes an inevitable change in the beers we want to stock in our fridges. Out are the ‘winter warmers’,  the dark porters, strong barley wines and robust stouts that warm us from the inside out while providing a days’ worth of calories, and in are the fruit beers, the IPA’s and the lagers.

Lagers are probably the most common style of beer in the world in terms of sheer quantity. Quite arguably the quintessential summer drink, and long the staple of ballparks and stadiums, lagers range in colour, hopiness and strength but share the defining characteristic of being fermented and stored at cool temperatures. In its perfect form (to me anyway) lagers are light bodied, crisp and refreshing; something you can drink ice cold and something that is safe to consume in multiples.

As always, I would like to give some background so you can to get to know your lagers a little better.

Moving from Dark to Light…

According to Randy Mosher in Tasting Beer, the origin of lagers is somewhat murky but generally the story goes that brewers in Bavaria were perfecting their craft by fermenting beer in natural caves or cellars dug into the limestone hillsides. Gradually, a new yeast strain emerged adapted to this cold weather brewing process. Flash forward five hundred or so years and Bavaria style lagers, and brewing practices, were transported to the New World with German immigrants.

The first lagers being produced in North America were dark brown beers and probably had little resemblance to the straw gold brews we have come to know today. We have Anton Schwartz, a brewing scientist, to thank for developing the cooking technique in the 1870’s, which afforded the use of lightening ingredients such as corn and rice. Couple with this the development of machine bottling and refrigeration and the stage is set for the birth of the modern lager.

A Bit about the Style

In terms of taste, cold-temperature and long fermentation times means less (or no) fruity esters in the beer, which ideally produces a clean, crisp taste focusing solely on the malts and hops. One of the great things about lagers is this simplicity; with only the choice of malt and hop determining the flavour profile subtle characteristics can emerge in the beer from honey and caramel to mint and herb. Mosher suggests that for this style any hint of fruitiness may indicate a too-warm fermentation temperature but subtle sulphur or DMS notes may be acceptable.

Some of the styles falling under the lager umbrella include: Pilsners, American Lagers, Malt Liqour, Dunkel, Oktoberfest, Bocks, Rauchbier and many other variations within. When you think about the vast range of tastes and appearances represented in these styles it is pretty amazing to believe all these beers are classified as lagers, a style essentially defined by a couple of strains of cold-temperature tolerant yeast!

The Best of the Best

I guess it is only fair to warn you that due to the mass popularity of the style, there are a lot of bad lagers out there. In fact, while I was perusing Rate Beer’s 50 Worst Beers list I noticed a disproportionate number of the bottom feeders were in fact lagers. But be brave and be perseverant because there is gold in ‘dem dar hills. Some notable lagers include:

Rate Beer – Mikkeller The American Dream, Pretty Things Lovely Saint Winefride, Pilsner Urquell Kvasnicový, Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock, Avery The Kaiser Imperial Oktoberfest, Dogfish Head Liquor de Malt, Surly SurlyFest, The Bruery Humulus Lager.

Beer Advocate – Snoqualmie Summer Beer, Fort George 1811 Pre-Prohibition Lager, Rogue Morimoto Imperial Pilsner, Full Sail Session Lager, Anchor Steam Beer, Brooklyn Lager, La Trappe Bockbier, Samuel Smith’s Organically Produced Lager Beer

World Beer Awards (2011) – Samuel Adams Double Bock, Bernard Dark, Samuel Adams Double Bock, APU Borgio, SA Damm Keler 18, Chatoe Rogue Dirtoir Black Lager, Egils Gull, International Breweries Australian Max, Hop City Barking Squirrel Lager, Eisenbahn Rauchbier

In my Fridge

Brooklyn Lager pours clear reddish gold with lots of off-white head that lingers. Slight carbonation in the glass. Sweet malt on the nose and citrus notes as well. Light bodied and very clean to drink. Taste wise there is some caramel and citrus with a bit of hoppy bitterness at the finish.


The Counter Culture Roots of Craft Beer

In 1969 Sociologist Theodore Roszak wrote a seminal book called “The Making of a Counter Culture”. In his book Roszak develops the concept of a counter culture, which is roughly defined as the provocative, new and even radical creations of a generation of youth profoundly alienated from the parental generation. It is a questioning of the status quo as represented by the dominant world view and an undermining of the foundations of what Rosazak termed the “technocracy” (technological aristocracy)  – read industrialization, mass marketization and homogenization of all aspects of culture. Roszak goes on to propose the “myth of the objective consciousness” postulating that a culture, which subordinates or degrades the visionary commits the sin of diminishing our existence. The question facing us is not “How shall we know?” but “How shall we live?”

It seems to me that we have been embracing this rejection of the technocracy in many facets of culture ever since. We are increasingly concerned with the inequitable and unsustainable way in which we interact with the earth and with each other. There seems to be a genuine desire for change driving many of the ways we now choose to live our lives, and nowhere is this more obvious than in our ever evolving relationship with food.

 

 

The Rise of the Foodie Culture

To me, there has been a profound shift in our relationship with (to) the foods we eat and the beverages we consume. Whether you call it visionary or merely a re-discovery, we are embracing a simplicity and accessibility to the things we consume. Building upon the foundation laid (or re-asserted) by counter culture ideals, the slow food movement challenges (and rejects) almost all the prevalent attitudes towards food and eating held by our parents. Microwaves, T.V. dinners and fast food were novel uses of our technology but ultimately they severed any ties we have to what we are putting in our bodies.

Carlo Petrini, the Italian founder of Slow Food, suggests “Our century, which began and developed under the insignia of industrial civilization, first invented the machine and then took it as its life model.” The ‘slow’ in slow food is not simply a rate of change but a way of being that encourages the development of a careful, reflective, quality-over-quantity, intuitive and receptive connection with our food. This desire to understand the foods we consume has manifested itself in countless ways from the notion of a 100-mile diet, the embracing organic and whole foods, the proliferation of farmers markets, the locally-sourced term on restaurant menus, the creation of Farm Folk/City Folk and so on. Oft-mocked as ‘foodies’ there is a growing base of consumers willing to pay more for less in order to re-establish that connection.

 

 

The (re)Birth of Real Ale

‘But that was my father’s beer.’ Interestingly this idea has resonance for many people. If it was good enough for my parents then it is good enough for me, it is what they always drank, that brewery has been in business for over a hundred years how bad can it be? The continued popularity of the leading big three lagers, sanitized and pasteurized to the point of having no discernible taste, presents an interesting challenge for counter culture adherents. Fortunately the other side of this stick-with-what-you-know notion is a rejection of the same old same old in favour of actually knowing what goes into your beer, how it is made, who brewed it, and where it comes from. Counter culture ideals are manifest in our (re)introduction to the world of real ale.

CAMRA, the Campaign for Real Ale, began in Britain in the late 1960’s with the aim of preserving traditional beer, which was being threatened by the industrialized and mass-marketed ‘beers’ that had become so ubiquitous. Real ale is naturally carbonated cask beer, in other words it is a slow food – it takes time to brew, time to ferment, time to carbonate, time to transport, and time to serve. CAMRA has spawned chapters all over the world uniting brewers and consumers passionate about the craft. Indeed the ever-increasing popularity of craft beer and microbreweries is an amazing testament to our culture’s desire to return to quality over quantity. Brewers have sought out ancient recipes, ingredients and techniques (Dogfish Head), they incorporate local elements into traditional styles (Driftwood) or better yet they grow their own (Rogue).

But there is also a cautionary tale here because as craft beer finds its niche others, less dedicated to the ideals of preservation, find a profitable market. Much like the juggernaut that has become organic food, how to set parameters to ensure the craft remains in craft beer? I feel we can look to one of the principle tenets, if not the principle tenet, of slow food balance for our answer. Being able to successfully market quality product, to be able to sustain and grow your business, and to be able to make a living doing something you love is always the goal; however, when business sense overtakes passion we take the first tentative steps down a very slippery slope.

 

 

*Thanks to Theodore Roszak The Making of a Counter Culture, Randy Mosher Tasting Beer, and Carl Honore In Praise of Slow for content.


Drowning in a Sea of Green in Seattle

Elysian Brewing Co. Research

 

This St. Patrick’s Day long weekend (well I took a long weekend anyway) found me sipping my way around some of Seattle’s breweries and maxing out my cross-border beer allowance. There is always a great energy in Seattle, and this trip was no exception as Pike Place Market was awash with live music, tourists and emerald clad runners looking to put back on any calories they may have burned off during the morning’s run.

 

First stop for us was The Pike Brewing Co. a veritable Seattle institution. It was beyond packed thanks in part to the fact they were serving three dollar pints of Naughty Nellie and Kilt Lifter at a cash-bar located in the brewery basement. Deciding to opt-out of the hour-long wait for an actual table we saddled up to the bar to do a little reconnaissance. After flagging down the harried barkeep we worked our way through The Pike Sampler, which proffers the standard six offerings from Pike:

Naughty Nellie is a Golden Organic Artisan Ale named for the madam at LaSalle where Pike was founded (beer and brothels together at last). A crisp, light ale with a 4.7% ABV and IBU of 24. Safe choice for the hard-drinking St. Paddy’s crowd since it was very quaffable or as Pike puts it ‘light and curvy with plenty of sex appeal’.

Pike Pale Ale an heirloom amber, 5.0% ABV and IBU 32, with that classic nutty character and reddish-brown colour. Apparently this is the first beer Pike brewed in 1989.

Pike IPA India Pale Ale for those residing is some sort of beer exile for the last two hundred years- a golden amber pour with lots of in-your-face hop character; a little bit flower and a little bit soap. An ABV of 6.3% and IBU of 62. Rumour has it this beer is one of the ‘300 Beers to Try Before You Die’. Mark it off my bucket list then.

Pike Kilt Lifter a lovely Scotch Ale that is ruby-amber and full of sweet malt elements. ABV of 6.5% and IBU of 27, Kilt Lifter is well-balanced with some bitter hops and a bit of a smoky character.

Pike XXXXX Extra Stout boasts a 7.0% ABV and IBU 65. ‘Sensuous and X rated’ this deep amber black beer has a ton of roast coffee flavour, a little bit of sweet chocolate and a nice burnt aftertaste.

Pike Monk’s Uncle is a Tripel (read Belgian) Ale with the heftiest ABV at 9.0% and IBU 34. Yeasty and sweet, whoa boy is this one sweet, brewed with organic candy sugar. A bit of fruit and a dry finish but I think the sugars ate all the yeast (and it is not even supposed to work that way).

 

Pike Thoughts: Kilt Lifter and the Pale Ale were my favourite beers, great brewpub with a great location in the market, cool beer swag and fun atmosphere – I would like to offer a shout out to the very drunk Southern gentleman drinking solo at the bar and trying to read the script on my tattoo upside down; you just can’t stage those kind of Kodak moments.

 

Next stop was Elysian Brewing Company’s brewpub in the Capitol Hill district; another great location in a trendy little region of the city boasting lots of coffee, foodie joints and general hipster-ness. We managed to work our way through two taster flights this time round and the rule is the resident beer geek does the selecting for you …fun!

From the regular line-up we tried The Immortal IPA, Mens’ Room Red, Dragonstooth Stout, Wise ESB, Avatar Jasmine IPA and Idiot Sauvin IPA. From the specialty beer line-up we sampled:

Bifrost Winter Ale a 7.6% hop-heavy beer balanced with a couple of different malts. ‘Bold, hoppy and smooth’ is the description from the brewers. For those who have not watched Thor, Bifrost is the mythical bridge connecting the mortal world to the heavens in Norse mythology.

Ryezome a 6.2% ABV beer aptly described as a ‘hoppy red rye’. Tons of bitterness tempered with that distinctive soured sweetness, which is the hallmark of rye.

Loki Lager ‘a smooth Dortmund-style lager’ with 4.8% ABV. Golden in colour with that elusive balance of malt and hop that makes a highly drinkable ball-park beer. Named for the Norse god and jester Loki.

Mongrel ‘Cascadian dark saison’ weighing in at a respectable 8.2% ABV. A little earthiness to this one, lots of malt and an extremely dry finish but somehow not quite reaching that saison benchmark.

Cocoa Mole from New Belgium Brewing Co. A 9% ABV monster chock full of chocolate and heat but surprisingly easy to drink with sweet malts and decent body to temper the chili peppers.

 

Elysian Thoughts: I really loved the beers we tried especially the Avatar and Loki BUT (notice this is a big but) the whole experience was tainted by the awful food, we left it virtually untouched but were charged nonetheless, and by the very mediocre service, I don’t think we ever saw the same server twice. I was surprised to see how much my view of the beer selection was impacted by the rest of my visit.

 

In addition to our brewery visits, we went to Full Throttle Bottles for the first time to do a little beer shopping and it was a pretty amazing little store. Situated in an up-and-coming part of Seattle this store was overflowing with ambience, wicked beer selections, and knowledgeable staff more than willing to talk shop with fellow beer geeks. I highly recommend taking the time to visit this beer shop next time you are in the Seattle area.

Some other recommendations from my beer shopping include Adam and Fred from Hair of the Dog (two separate beers) and Noble Rot from Dogfish Head. All three were outstanding beers.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 


‘Kick you down the stairs’ Beer

Awhile back I was perusing the selection at O’Hares liquor store when the manager recommended DeuS Brut des Flandres as a beer that would ‘kick me down the stairs’. Intrigued and slightly confused by the sales pitch I promptly bought a bottle. What I learned later is that DeuS is a nice example of a strong Belgian Ale; the ‘kick you down the stairs’ adjective comes from the relatively high ABV of 11.5%.  Using this as a launching point I thought I would devote this post to an exploration of strong beers.

Strength in the brewing world refers to both alcohol (the main product of fermentation) and gravity (the amount of solids in the unfermented wort). More malt brings more alcohol and more malt requires more hops in what can become a delicate dance between strength and drinkability. Gravity is used as a rough measure of the amount of alcohol that may end up in the finished beer; however, not every wort of the same gravity will end up as a beer with the same alcohol content. A whole other host of variables comes into play before we get our final ABV including the brewing process, yeast strain, sugar used, fermentation temperature etc. Brewers use the concept of apparent attenuation -finishing gravity divided by starting gravity subtracted from one hundred- to arrive at an approximate, if not entirely accurate, idea of beer strength. Real attenuation can only be assessed through the labour intensive process of distilling the alcohol out of a small sample but this is not commonly done. The higher the apparent attenuation the more of the beer’s extract has been turned into alcohol and voila we have a strong beer.

As a quick historical aside, the quest to make strong beer is not solely a modern endeavor in fact there are several Old English terms for strong beer including Stingo, Huffcap, Nipitatum, Clamber-skull, Dragon’s milk, Mad-dog, Lift-leg, Angel’s food and Stride-wide.

Back to modern brewing; beer styles such as barley wines, stouts, quadruples and double IPA’s all enter into this strong beer realm and a few brave brewers have ventured beyond into the ‘ultra-strong experimental’ kingdom. When it comes to taste these beers really have much more in common with fine liquors like scotch or cognac and they should be sampled as such; small pours in proper glassware, served as aperitifs and shared amongst friends. Some notable examples include:

Brewer Beer Name Beer Style/Description ABV
BrewDog Tokyo Intergalactic fantastic oak aged stout 18.2%
BrewDog Tactical Nuclear Penguin Beer for the dedicated 32%
BrewDog Sink the Bismark IPA for the dedicated 41%
BrewDog End of History Belgian blond infused with nettles and juniper berries 55%
The Bruery Black Tuesday Imperial Stout 19.5%
Dogfish Head Fort Belgian ale brewed with a ridiculous amount of raspberries 15-18%
Dogfish Head World Wide Stout A very dark beer brewed with a ridiculous amount of barley 15-20%
Fouders Brewing Devil Dancer Triple IPA 12%
Kleinbrauerei Schorschbrau Schorschbock 40 Whisky like brew 40%
Mikkeller Big V Barley Wine 15%
The Refrigerated Ship Start the Future Drink it like a cocktail 60%
Samuel Adams Utopias Barrel aged beers 24-27%

 

As one might suspect the quest for the title of world’s strongest beer has become a somewhat farcical game of one-up-man-ship; please see the following video by BrewDog for your consideration.

*Thanks to Mosher, Randy 2009 Tasting Beer An Insider’s Guide to the World’s Greatest Drink.


West Coast Beer Geek

Reviewing Craft Beer, Beer Events, Beer Pairings & More

Ride & hike for the environment

raising awareness and funds for Green Teams of Canada

I Think About Beer

& I Think About Cider - Belgian Beer & European Cider

B.C. Beer Blog

The who, what, where, when, why, and how of B.C. craft beer

Freshfully Rad

Jesse Radonski's thoughts on videogames, food, craft beer, social media and more

The Great Canadian Beer Snob

Your guide to the wonderful world of beer!

Cambridge Park Beer Club

Coming together over craft beer.

Mike's Craft Beer

We review craft beer from around the world.

leapbeer

Mission : Leap Beer, 366 Beers in 366 Days

8bitbeerblog

Old School Gamers Checking out New School Beers

The Parting Glass

For the Love of Great Beer